Your resolve 토토커뮤니티 stronger

“Let’s review, Daniel-san,” he told me as we sat

down. Sometimes after a workout, we’d drink some tea

and enjoy the view from his simple patio overlooking the

coastline.

“At this point, you understand that-whether

positive, negative, or anywhere in between-all emotions

are created by what we are thinking. You understand

that the stronger the warrior is able to build his self-

belief system, the better. You understand that self-

belief, a good attitude, confidence, and positive self-talk

are what “get things going.” You understand that

emotions affect performance. So, if bad emotions arise,

you understand there are ways you can learn to control

their impact on your performance. Right?”

“Roger that.”

He gave me an odd look 먹튀사이트.

“Yes,” I corrected.

“Good. Then you also know how imagery, focused

breathing, and relaxation all help to give us a mental

edge over the competition.”

“Very tricky,” I teased him.

“Be serious now, Daniel-san, and pay close

attention, because today we must talk about anger . . .

We all get angry; this is normal. Yet you must always

remember that if the warrior does not control his anger

it will always end up controlling him. And when that

happens, victory will be much more difficult. You see,

anger is an emotional response. Before the emotion is

allowed to take control, the warrior must redirect its

energy. Real champions work to develop an ability to

control their anger so that it cannot hurt their

performance.”

I grappled with this: “Do you mean that they end up

no longer feeling this kind of emotion?”

“Not at all. I mean that they have learned how to

channel such an emotion so that it won’t affect their

focus and performance in a negative way. With anger,

once the emotion comes up-or boils up!-real

champions make a deliberate choice to use the energy,

but they do not allow themselves to lose control to it or

fall victim to it.”

“How?”

“They ask themselves, ‘Who is in charge here? -

Me? Or this fury inside myself?’ By that simple act, the

warrior spirit begins to regain control. And that control

begins with a simple choice, a decision. The warrior

decides to channel the anger into making his resolve

stronger still. He redirects the anger into tough play.

He creates a stronger resolve to beat the competition

and to raise his own level of play. Rather than losing

control to the anger, he becomes like a smiling assassin;

he’s mad, yes, but it’s a cool, calculating mad. He is

using the intensity and the passion of the emotion, yet

he doesn’t lose control to it. The champion knows that

in order to perform well, he must stay in control. How

else can he expect to control his performance?”

“OK, so how does one manage the intensity of the

emotion?” I asked him.

“It always starts with a choice to not let it control

you,” said Leo-tai. “Concentrate and use focused

breathing to help manage the intensity. Use internal

self-talk with suggestions like: Stay Cool, Relax, Be

Calm-to help you stay in control. Imagery and

relaxation techniques are also powerful tools that can be

used to manage the intensity of an anger reaction. All of

these-worked on and practiced-will help. But there

must first, always be a choice.”

“And Daniel-san, if you should ever feel that you

must vent your anger, remember that it’s better to do it

privately, so that you do not shake the confidence of the

team’s trust in you. To let them see you lose control,

even if you felt you needed it for yourself, can only hurt

that trust.”

Remember: If anger arises, make the

decision to not let it control you. Use techniques

to redirect the energy; use the energy to make

your resolve stronger. Become like the smiling

assassin that sees his mark.

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